Arduino RFID – 7 Segment LED Display

 

Getting started

RFID

Arduino UNO, RFID and 7 segment display

I have built an RFID reader that displays some info on a 7 segment LED display. With the Arduino this is quite simple and a lot of fun. RFIDs are electronic pieces that use radio frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. RFIDs can also be called RFID Tags, most of them will create have an ID. This can be used to identify them individually and perform specific tasks for each one of them. In this case the different tags will produce a different result on the display. Nevertheless, you can make an RFID engage with a computer or electronic in any way that you want.

You will need

  • RC522 RFID reader
  • 7 Segment LED Display
  • 7 X 240Ω resistors
  • Jump wires
  • Breadboard
  • Arduino Uno

Assemble

To assemble everything together, I have provided an image to connect the wires and devices. You can also download the Fritzing file. Alternatively, here is an image of how everything has been connected.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Download the Fritz file here.

Download Fritz

What it does

The LED display can be able to display the information that is typed in the console. The RFID will just read what are the values of the ID and store the data in rfid.serNum[4] which in this case, I am using 102 and 46 ;. To find out the IDs’ of your tags, unhighlight the commented lines (line:372) to print the rfid.serNum[4]; on the console. You can add rfid.serNum[4],DEC; to find its decimal value or rfid.serNum[4],HEX to convert that on to hexadecimal and then use it to activate the if/else statements.

Arduino

Once you have everything connected, run the Arduino code.

Thanks!

Hope you find this helpful!

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Designing some Internet of Things – The Town Light

I have been experimenting lately with some Internet of Things (IoT) object. Some time ago, I attended a workshop at the MadLab at Manchester. Adrian McEwen presented his Bubblino, an Arduino bot that makes bubbles triggered by a Twitter message. He has written a book about designing IoT things. Based on all these examples I started experimenting myself. Working with some IoT myself, I started planning how user interfaces (UI) might affect how do we use the data that is streamed on the Web.

The Night Light Town

This is an experiment that reads the amount of light. The light data is sent to a server, which then is returned. Once the data is sent back, the Arduino reads the value and depending on the intensity, it turns on or off a LED.

To set up this you need:

  • Arduino
  • Arduino Ethernet/WiFi Shield
  • Photocell
  • 1k Ohm Resistor
  • 220 Ohm Resistor
  • A Breadboard

Here is the layout. You can use Fritzing to check more in detail how to set it up.

light_bb

Fritz File

Alternatively you can download the Fritzing File:

Using Xively to Monitor Data

 Xively is a service that allows you to monitor data and then make other services or object react. In this case I use it to dump the light data to it and then get it to send it back to me. I followed the basic tutorial from the Xively website. Nevertheless, they provided the code for the WiFi Arduino Shield, so I had to make some basic modifications. This final script was based on the ones provided by Xively and Paul Bellamy.

Here is MY final code. (Make sure you include the libraries)